​we rely on high quality crops
​from superios farmers...

Farmers with high quality standards are a prerequisite for producing superior plant proteins​.

IMPROVING MILK YIELD WITH 5-10%

The promise to the milk farmers receiving the “pulp” (pressed, chopped grass) from the process is (a) a similar silage quality, compared to what they have today and (b) a potential milk yield increase of +5%.

Resent research Protein value and degradation characteristics of pulp fibre fractions from screw pressed grass, clover, and Lucerne demonstrated that pulp from twin-screw pressing of white clover, red clover, lucerne, and perennial ryegrass has a protein concentration and value for ruminants, which is similar to the original plant material.

Similarly, initial research in Denmark (source in Danish) (additional research is ongoing) with 36 Holstein cows demonstrated that the milk yield (ECM) rose from 33,5 kg/day to 37,0 kg/day, when feeding cows with silage from the twin-screw protein-extraction-process.​​

BETTER RESULTS FOR THE PIG FARMER

Introduction BiomassProtein™ grass protein with higher content of essential amino acids for pigs will increase the sustainability of organic pig production using local grown plant material, while decreasing the strong dependency for soy bean import in Europe.

​Recent studies with feeding trials where soy was replaced with grass protein have shown that the weaned pigs liked the feed, had a similar (or better) growth rate, feed conversion rate and slaughter weight compared to the control group.​

CHICKEN AND EGG...

Introducing the BiomassProtein™ grass protein with higher content of essential amino acids for poultry will increase the sustainability of organic poultry production using local grown plant material, while decreasing the strong dependency for soy bean import in Europe. 

The BiomassProtein™ grass protein has a high methionine content and the beta-carotene content has a positive effect on yolk color.​

Studies with layers have shown that substituting soy beans with grass protein in layers had no effect on egg production, egg weight, feed intake or feed conversion rate, compared to the control group. 

However, there was a significant and positive effect on yolk color, where lightness was lower and yellowness and redness higher with increasing inclusion of grass protein. (link to article)